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Announcements and News

Yoho: AGM Meeting - August 28, 2016

Posted by Ann on Wednesday Aug 01, 2016 @05:40 PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Ann writes "

Free barbecue and AGM set for Aug. 28. 2016. Everyone is welcome, location the Yoho Scout Lodge. The barbecue will be at 1pm, a presentation on Bleu Green Algae starts at 2:00, the AGM will follow at 3:00p.m. The Yoho Lake Association welcomes suggestions for topics to be discussed at the annual general meeting. Do you have any concerns about the Yoho Lake area? Please submit discussion topics to Association President Sean Haley, repurch@nbnet.nb.ca. Discussion topics will also be accepted at the AGM."

 

Ann Bridges, Secretary

 

Yoho: AGM Meeting - August 23, 2015

Posted by Ann on Wednesday Jun 03, 2015 @12:29 PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Ann writes "

Hello Everyone,

Most of you should have received the Yoho Echo and are aware that YLA has been granted a $12,000 ETF grant! The YLA association has been monitoring the water quality and recording changes since 2011. With this new money we will go one step further and add soil sampling to our already existing water monitoring data collection. With this study we hope to come up with a remedial action to reduce nutrient input. In the coming weeks you will see individual collecting samples, around the Lake. At the Aug 23, 2015 AGM we will have results to share with the public hope to see you there! ."
 

Ann Bridges, Secretary

 

Yoho: New Echo News - June 02, 2015

Posted by Forrest on Tuesday Jun 02, 2015 @09:00 AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Forrest writes "

Hello Everyone,

The Latest Echo is hot off the presses!

Yoho Echo News > 2015."

 

Forrest Orser, Yoho Echo Editor

 

Yoho: Special Bulletin & LSD Information Meeting - June 26, 2013

Posted by Gwen on Tuesday Jun 18, 2012 @9:29 PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Gwen writes "

Good evening, all: Attached please find a Special Bulletin for the Yoho Lake Association. Political and community efforts since 2007 have resulted in a proposal to form the Rural Community of Hanwell–Kingsclear. Yoho Lake would become part of that Rural Community . To learn what this could mean for the Yoho community, please attend the public meeting on Wednesday, June 26 at the Yoho Scout Camp . If you cannot make the Yoho meeting, you could visit one of the meetings at Kingsclear, Silverwood or Hanwell. Please see the bulletin for further details.
 

Best wishes !"

Gwen Martin, Communications Committee Co-Chair

 

 

Yoho: Adopt A Highway - Fall Clean-Up

Posted by Larry on Friday Aug 24, 2012 @10:22 AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Larry writes "

Adopt a Highway will be on Sept 8, raindate is Sept 15 - we are looking for volunteers!
 
 
1) I will be at the mouth of the Yoho Lake Rd between 9:00am and 10:00 am, to pass out garbage bags and assign (record) the areas people wish to collect garbage along. Volunteer’s names will be recorded with their area to avoid duplication of pick up areas.
 
2) The two routes that we collect debris along are;
>  Yoho Lake Rd -start at Hanwell Road to the end of Yoho Lake Rd, and
>  Hanwell Road north a short distance from where the Yoho Lake Rd starts, south to where the Hunter Rd intersects
 
3) Volunteers can pick up debris along their assigned areas, at their convenience, Sat AM or Sat PM., or on Sunday
 
4) Areas assigned will be designated with pink flagging tape along the road way.
 
Any questions please do not hesitate to write or phone.
 
Keep Smiling "
 

Larry Sommerville, Adopt-A-Highway Committee Chair

 

 

Yoho: Green Algae Articles - Various Local Lakes

Posted by Darren on Thursday Aug 20, 2012 @09:00 AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Darren writes "

Here is a collection of articles to do with blue green algae invading various lakes and waterways in New Brunswick "

Blue Green Algae Collection...>>

 

 

 

Yoho: Save My Lake! - Lake Winnipeg - The Green Attack

Posted by Laker on Friday June 22, 2012 @08:00 PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Laker writes "

The Nature of Things | Season 2010-11 | Jun 22, 2012 | 45:08

There is a mystery blooming in Lake Winnipeg's waters and it is one that science is only now waking up to. We'll investigate what's happening to Lake Winnipeg."
 

 

Yoho: Lake Monitoring - June 17

Posted by Bonny on Sunday June 17, 2012 @06:09 AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Bonny writes "

Well today it has started, the initial step in our monitoring program. Seven lakes are participating in a training on the how too's of lake monitoring. The Department of Environment and Local Government is conducting a training session from the Scout Camp. Those monitoring from our lake are Warren MacLaughlin, Victor Hendricken, Jim Hallett and Kevin Larlee."

Bonny Hoyt-Hallett, President YLA

 

Yoho: Jamboree - June 22-24 Weekend

Posted by Shawn on Wednesday June 16, 2012 @08:08 AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Sean writes "

Hello All,

I think you should check with the Scout Lodge----there is a large jamboree  on the 22-24 weekend of June...

Sean Haley "

 

Yoho: Adopt A Highway - Spring Clean-Up

Posted by Larry on Wednesday June 16, 2012 @07:37 AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Larry writes "

Adopt a Highway will be on May 26, 2012 - we are looking for volunteers!
 
 
1) I will be at the mouth of the Yoho Lake Rd between 9:00am and 10:00 am, to pass out garbage bags and assign (record) the areas people wish to collect garbage along. Volunteer’s names will be recorded with their area to avoid duplication of pick up areas.
 
2) The two routes that we collect debris along are;
>  Yoho Lake Rd -start at Hanwell Road to the end of Yoho Lake Rd, and
>  Hanwell Road north a short distance from where the Yoho Lake Rd starts, south to where the Hunter Rd intersects
 
3) Volunteers can pick up debris along their assigned areas, at their convenience, Sat AM or Sat PM., or on Sunday
 
4) Areas assigned will be designated with pink flagging tape along the road way.
 
Any questions please do not hesitate to write or phone.
 
Keep Smiling "
 

Larry Sommerville, Adopt-A-Highway Committee Chair

 


 

Yoho: Adopt A Highway - Fall Clean-Up

Posted by Larry on Monday September 12, 2011 @08:27 AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Larry writes "The Yoho Lake Association is a proud participant to the Adopt a Highway Program. New volunteers are much needed, especially for the Hanwell Road, John and Jerry Chessie Roads. Please plan to be part of this worthwhile community event. When: Saturday, September 17th, start time 9h00. Where: Volunteers to meet at the entrance of the Yoho Lake Road (by the mailboxes) for 9h00 am. See you there !

Larry Sommerville, Adopt-A-Highway Committee Chair

 

Yoho: Be Aware of Health Risks of Algal Blooms

Posted by Michele on Thursday August 18, 2011 @01:27 PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Michele writes "It may help remind the residents how fortunate we’ve been SO FAR, not to have to deal with blue-green algae out at Yoho Lake. "

Public Alert :18 August 2011

FREDERICTON (CNB) – New Brunswickers are advised to be aware of the potential health risks posed by algal blooms in lakes and other bodies of water. The Department of Health issued this reminder today.

Algae blooms can occur in waters when the appropriate conditions are present; this usually occurs during the summer months or early fall. While not all algae blooms are problematic, blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, can produce microcystin toxins.

Microcystins may cause skin, eye and throat irritation and may lead to more serious health effects if consumed.

The water cannot be consumed even after boiling as this does not remove the toxins. Fish caught from water where such blooms are present should have all its organs removed and be thoroughly rinsed with potable water before it is cooked and consumed.

The Department of Health encourages the public to be active and enjoy the outdoors, however, since blooms can be unpredictable people need to be cautious. Before entering a body of water, take note of its quality. Where an algae bloom is suspected (paint-like scum and/or blue/green or other discoloured water) avoid swimming, water-skiing or other recreational activities.

Young children and those with skin conditions may be particularly vulnerable. Blue-green algae can be fatal to pets and livestock.

The departments of health and environment are working together to ensure that reported or suspected blooms are evaluated and that advisories are posted where appropriate. If you suspect that an algae bloom may be present in a lake, please report this information to the nearest Department of Environment regional office.

More information about blue-green algae is available online.

Source : Department of Health: www.gnb.ca/health

Michele Roussel."

 

Yoho: Yoho Lake Association BBQ & AGM

Posted by Michele on Monday August 01, 2011 @09:41AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Michele writes "When? Sunday, August 21, 2011 ; 1h00 to 3h00

Where? Scouts Canada (Rivorton Area) Main Lodge

This community event will be an opportunity to bring together old friends, greet new neighbors and hear about what’s new around “our” lake.

Guest speakers will share helpful information on how we can all be part of making this a great place to live, rest or play, while safeguarding the lake’s natural beauty and its’ water quality.

Please plan to join us. Full time residents are asked to extend a special invitation to their “seasonal” neighbors.

Looking forward to seeing you all there!

Michele Roussel."

Yoho: Marine animals called Bryozoa

Posted by Gordon on Wednesday September 09, 2009 @10:32AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Gordon writes "We discovered these Marine animals in Yoho this summer and never had a clue what they were.I have the write up and I think every one would be very interested in knowing they only appear in fresh water and its a given that they only appear in clean water.

Gordon Hovey."

Yoho: Re: Uranium Mining claims near Yoho Lake

Posted by Steve on Wednesday August 15, 2007 @7:00PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Stevew writes "Maybe some of your questions are answered here ...

In any case this should be addressed at the Yoho Lake Association meeting in the next couple of weeks tentatively. Susan is still fixing a date with a guest speaker.

Stevew."

Yoho: Uranium Mining claims near Yoho Lake

Posted by William on Monday August 13, 2007 @11:50PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

William writes "I have been made aware that Lone Pine Exploration Services Limited has staked mineral claims on a large tract of land on the Hanwell Road less than a mile
from the Yoho Lake Road for Alpha Uranium Resources Inc License number 15292,
#2-80 Raddall Ave, Dartmouth, N.S. B3B 1T7. If you see blue tape, this is the
marker for the claims. A tract of land near Harvey Lake has also been claimed,
but I do not know who by or where precisely. I do not know if these claims are
part of the Yoho Lake watershed, but the proximity of the claim should be a
concern for all property owners at Yoho Lake.

William Gough."

Yoho: Yoho on Google Earth

Posted by Troy on Monday March 19, 2007 @3:26PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Troy writes "Google Earth has a great view of YOHO... Check it out... or try it.
- Google Earth combines the power of Google Search with satellite imagery, maps, terrain and 3D buildings to put the world's geographic information at your fingertips-

Troy."

 

Yoho: Say Hello Anytime

Posted by Denise on Saturday Nov 11, 2006 @7:26PM
from Somewhere on the Lake.

Denise writes "I have finally had time to go thru all the web site and found it very interesting. Have lived at Yoho Lake for over 5 years and the living just gets better. I am home! I feed the birds and try to keep track of their coming and goings. As well as loon watching and eagles that land on my property! Have had an owl try to take a grey squirrel from my deck in broad daylight, a flying squirrel INSIDE the house. LOL A family of fisher living under steps down by water. Deer eating my (first time they were going to bloom) enchinca. Tracks that I swear were like a cougar's. Raccoons not deterred by a bucket of water. Ground hogs patrolling the steps going down to water and of course the friendly wasps that required a full suited friend to relocate. Woodpeckers that want to remove my deck railing. Red squirrels that seem to have stopped chasing their young off, a good summer for squirrels I would say, at least 2 cycles this year. I worked long hours this summer so I really missed a lot I am sure. I would like to know if our single loon finally found a new partner or if there is a new couple that took up residence. I have seen multiple loons and of course they have different calls. Not around enough to confidently say who is who. Did anyone see any young ones? I would like to meet more people from around the lake, a paddleboat/ regatta would be fun. Or an open house day, where every one who flys a certain flag or sign at there dock, means stop by and say hello. A poker run type of thing would be fun, especially if done with slow moving, no-motor watercraft. I have cross-country skis, anyone up for a short jaunt? Well, that’s enough for this time. Hope some of these comments make it on to the site. Thanks, and if you see me outside stop and introduce yourself and say hello. ..

Denise."

Yoho: Chimney Cleaning

Posted by Susan on Monday August 29, 2006 @10:34PM
from Somewhere on the Lake.

Susan writes "Anyone interested in getting together as a group to get a better price on chminey cleaning should call or email me before September 17th. We will plan to get it done as soon as possible after that date..

Susan."

Yoho: Adopt a Highway Yoho Lake

Posted by Lawrence on Friday August 25, 2006 @17:07PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Lawrence writes "Just a short note to let you know that I have picked Sept 16/06 for this years Adopt A Highway for the Yoho Lake Rd and the Hanwell Rd area. Same routine as in previous years: area assignments to be taken between 9-10:00 am Sat. mouth of Yoho Lake Rd. Pick your area and give time when the area will be cleaned.

Garbage bags and our highly prized and sought after Adopt a Highway hats to be provided.


Everyone welcome, many hands make for light work. Rain date Sept 23/06. Signs to be posted at the mouth of the four main lake roads. Barbecue at Susan's @ 12:30 for the participants. See you all there.

Keep Smiling.

 

Larry Somerville."

 

Yoho: Annual General Meeting

Posted by Susan on Sunday Aug 13, 2006 @22:06PM
from Somewhere on the Lake.

Susan writes " Yoho Lake Annual Meeting

It is going to be at the Jensen Lodge - Same as last year.
Sunday August 27th


BBQ at 1:00 pm, and

Meeting at 2:00 pm.

Thanks
Susan

"

Yoho: Recreational Canoe Course

Posted by Susan on Tuesaday May 30, 2006 @21:38PM
from Somewhere on the Lake.

Susan writes " There will be a Recreational Canoe Course offered July 8th at 10:00 with a Barbeque to follow at approx. 12:30. There will be a fee of $20.00. Anyone who is interested should contact Susan Jonah at 366-3724 before July 1st for
information or to register.
.

 
Thanks
Susan

"

Yoho: Big Stuff Garbage Pickup Day

Posted by Susan on Thursady May 18, 2006 @20:34PM
from Somewhere on the Lake.

Susan writes " I would like to remind everybody that Big Stuff Garbage pickup day is Monday May 29.  That is the day they will take all the big stuff.  It is really important to get rid of it then, rather than putting it in the dumpsters .

 
Thanks
Susan>

"

Yoho: Adopt a Highway Yoho Lake

Posted by Lawrence on Sunday May 7, 2006 @21:31PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Larry writes " Thanks to the volunteers who assisted with this years Spring 2006, Adopt A Highway. All areas on the Hanwell Rd or the Yoho Lake Rd have either been cleaned or volunteers have committed to clean their designated area in the next couple of days.

A special thanks goes out to the Race Family, who volunteered to clean up 4 of the 6 designated areas on the Yoho Lake Rd .

Jack MacDougall, a new area resident was also quick to volunteer his service for the Hanwell Rd area.

It is hoped that our Fall Adopt a Highway program will see a few more volunteers. All we ask is about 1-2 hours of your time to make a difference. You never know what you might find????? Some have found money, some have found recyclables, some have found pleasure in being able to make a difference in the appearance of our roadways.

Watch for notice of our Fall Adopt a Highway program.

You could win an " Adopt A Highway" hat (collectable item) by being a volunteer.

For further information, please do not hesitate to call or e-mail.

Keep Smiling "


Larry Somerville
Yoho Lake Area Adopt A Highway Chairman
Ph 457-1122
e-mail afs@nbnet.nb.ca

Yoho: Adopt a Highway Yoho Lake

Posted by Lawrence on Monday April 17, 2006 @21:07PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Ann writes "The Adopt a Highway will be on May 6 th for the Yoho Lake area this year, with a rain date of May 13 th. I hope lots of people have time to participate because as they say, “many hands make light work”. This year there will be a BBQ at 12:30pm for all those who participate in the garbage pickup. It will be at Sue’s, 462 Yoho Lake Rd."

 

Below is written by Larry Somerville as to what will take place on the day of the pickup:

Larry writes "

1) I will be at the mouth of the Yoho Lake Rd between 9:00am and 10:00 am, to pass out garbage bags and assign (record) the areas people wish to collect garbage along. Volunteer’s names will be recorded with their area to avoid duplication of pick up areas.

2) The two routes that we collect debris along are;

  • Yoho Lake Rd -start at Hanwell Road to the end of Yoho Lake Rd, and
  • Hanwell Road north a short distance from where the Yoho Lake Rd starts, south to where the Hunter Rd intersects

3) Volunteers can pick up debris along their assigned areas, at their convenience, Sat AM or Sat PM., or on Sunday

4) Areas assigned will be designated with pink flagging tape along the road way.

5) Rain date will be Sat., May 13th (Hopefully it does not rain on the 6th as May 13th is Mothers Day Weekend.)

6) Barbeque at Sue's at 12:30 PM on Sat May 6 th.

These dates are earlier than previous years due to the unusual winter we just had. I hope this will be early enough to avoid the black flies.

Any questions please do not hesitate to write or phone.

Keep Smiling

Larry"

Yoho: Wedding Reception

Posted by Stephanie on Sunday April 16, 2006 @19:02PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Stephanie writes " Hello ! My brother owns a lot at Yoho (on John Chessie) and we will be having an outdoor wedding reception there on August 4th. We are looking to see if anyone around the lake would be interested in renting their place for family and friends of ours from out of town. Just wondering if anyone can help or has any names / suggestions? Looking forward to hearing from someone...Thanks !

Contact: 455-0501"

Yoho: Canada Geese

Posted by Ann on Tuesday March 28, 2006 @12:52PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Ann writes "It is March 28th and it looks like spring has arrived! I heard Canada Geese last night when I was out walking my dog Jake, and I noticed that my Irises are up at least at inch. I am hoping for a new record on the ice going out. I’ve been here seven years and I think my first spring here it went out the first week of April. Don’t know if that record can be beaten but I’m hoping….

It has been two years since the directory has been updated, so if anyone has had a new neighbor move in please email this info to the address on the front of the directory, so when we print it off it will be as up to date as possible. Anyone who does not have a copy right now can let us now and we will get you one. I would like to thank all the people who have emailed and let us know of errors and changes to the directory.

Last fall at the Yoho Lake annual meeting there was a lot of interest in a Yoho-Lake web page, well it has been up for about a month now and I hope that many of you have had an opportunity to view it. It has lots of interesting info. We would really like to hear from our Yoho Lake community, as to what you would like to see there or not see there. I know that there is tons of local talent out there just waiting to be discovered, and I do not pretend to be on of them, I was just hoping to get the “ball rolling”…we are interested in anything you have to offer, boating tips, gardening tips, interesting vacation spots, for sale items, funny stories, poems, announcements, photos, anything you have to share we want to hear form you !!!! "

Yoho: Dumpsters

Posted by Susan on Tuesday March 14, 2006 @08:52PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Susan writes " There will be two dumpsters for the end of the Yoho Lake Rd. They will arrive around April 15. They are for household garbage only. Garbage pick up will still be on the same day and as usual. This means the "summies" will have a place to put their garbage out, rather than leaving it out by the side of the road for the critters....incase they wont be here for garbage day.....

The dumpster for Hanson Rd. will come later on the usual date.

Spring Clean up is round the corner, will confirm the date."

 

Yoho: Kayak Pointers

Posted by Susan on Monday March 6, 2006 @12:52PM
from Somewhere on the Lake.

Susan writes " Kayaking and Canoe Pointers course to be announced this summer!."

 

Yoho: Yoho Echo Newsletter

Posted by Susan on Sunday March 5, 2006 @02:52PM
from Somewhere on the Lake.

Susan writes " Yoho Echo Newsletter has a request for articles. I believe Gwen will be incharge of it this year, though I am not 100 percent sure. "

 

 

 

Yoho Echo News

The Yoho Echo is the local newsletter/newspaper that covers local issues and goings on in the community. Past Issue's may be available in .pdfs.

 

Yoho Echo News > Nov 2016

Yoho Echo News > May 2016

Yoho Echo News > Jun 2015

Yoho Echo News > Aug 2014

Yoho Echo News > May 2014

Yoho Echo News > Jan 2014

Yoho Echo News > Aug 2013

Yoho Echo News > Aug 2012

Yoho Echo News > Feb 2012

 

 

Yoho Echo News > Oct 2002

Yoho Echo News > Oct 2001

Yoho Echo News > Oct 1999

Yoho Echo News > May 1999

Yoho Echo News > May 1998

Yoho Echo News > Jul 1995

Yoho Echo News > Jul 1993

 

Articles and Facts

 

Growth of Algae in Lake Near Edmundston 'A Dire Situation'

Rankin, Andrew . Telegraph-Journal [Saint John, N.B] 13 Aug 2012: A.1.

Louis Labrie knew something was seriously wrong when the lake he lives near turned a bright toxic green early last month.

Subsequent tests completed by the province's department of environment confirmed his worst fears: that Lac Unique in Saint-Francois-de-Madawaska, about 60 kilometres west of Edmundston, is being ravaged by algal blooms, an explosive growth of blue-green algae - and the residents inhabiting the 100 or so homes along its shores are mostly to blame.

Source:pdf

 

 

The Risks of Blue-green Algae

The Bugle-Observer [Woodstock, N.B] 17 July 2012: A.4.

New Brunswickers are advised to be aware of the potential health risks posed by some algal blooms in lakes and other bodies of water.

" Algae blooms can occur in waters during the summer or early fall," said Dr. Eilish Cleary, New Brunswick's chief medical officer of health. "While not all algae blooms are problematic, blue-green algae , or cyanobacteria, can produce microcystin toxins, which may cause skin, eye and throat irritation and may lead to more serious health effects if consumed."

 

Source: pdf

 

Enjoy Water but Watch for Algae

Telegraph-Journal [Saint John, N.B] 14 July 2012: B.3.

CHAMCOOK LAKE - Enjoy the water this summer but keep an eye out for algae blooms, the provincial Health Department advises. Blue green algae , or cyanobacteria, blooms in the summer when it gets the right water temperature and nutrients. When it dies it produces microcystin toxins, which can cause skin, eye and throat irritation, and more serious effects if consumed, Dr. Eilish Cleary, the province's chief medical officer of health, stated in a public advisory. Young children with skin conditions might be particularly vulnerable. It can kill pets and livestock.

 

Source: pdf

 

Look Out for Blue-green Algae

Daily Gleaner [Fredericton, N.B] 12 July 2012: A.6.

When looking to cool off in a lake or pond this summer, New Brunswickers should be aware of blue-green algae that blooms in warm weather.

The algae , which gets its common name from it's colour can be toxic or even poisonous if swallowed.

"While not all algae blooms are problematic, blue-green algae , or cyanobacteria, can produce microcystin toxins, which may cause skin, eye and throat irritation and may lead to more serious health effects if consumed," said chief medical officer of health, Dr. Eilish Cleary.

Children and anyone who already has skin conditions should take extra caution as the algae can be fatal to many animals.

 

Source: pdf

Owners of Lakeside Properties to Meet

Gowan, Derwin . Telegraph-Journal [Saint John, N.B] 12 July 2012: C.6.

Landowners affecting the lake from which St. Andrews draws its municipal water will meet this weekend to organize a single voice.

The Chamcook Watershed Landowners Association will hold its charter meeting at the Bayside Community Hall at 2 p.m. Saturday, steering committee member Donne Smith confirmed Wednesday afternoon.

The move to form an association began after the provincial Health Department issued an advisory about blue-green algae in Chamcook Lake , the town of St. Andrews' drinking water supply, in September of 2010.

The algae abated when late-summer rain filled the lake . The Health Department lifted the advisory, but the town of St. Andrews, provincial government, Eastern Charlotte Waterways and others continued to worked on the issue.

 

Source: pdf

 

 

Irishtown Park Lake Closed to Recreation

Anonymous . The Times - Transcript [Moncton, N.B] 03 Aug 2011: A.3.

The City of Moncton is cautioning park users that the lake at the Irishtown Nature Park is now closed to water recreation. Pet owners must also keep their dogs out of the water and not let them drink the water because some of the bays in the park have green-coloured algae floating to the surface. The growth of algae blooms has been a problem in the former reservoir for the last several summers, and the city has a weekly water quality-monitoring program to keep an eye on it.

The City of Moncton is advising the public that the algae is concentrated and samples are being sent for confirmation of non-toxic species.

 

Source: pdf

 

Community Deals with Foul Smell; n Pointe-a-Bouleau seeks to remedy pungent smell that is the result of rotting algae

Huras, Adam . Times ; The Times - Transcript [Moncton, N.B] 26 July 2011: A.3.

POINTE-A-BOULEAU - When the wind blows it smells like rotten eggs for miles in this northern New Brunswick community.

"It's very, very foul," said Weldon McLaughlin, chairman of the local service district committee of Pointe-a-Bouleau, just east of Tracadie-Sheila.

"People who live near the area can't keep their windows open, they can't go outside, it has an effect on our quality of living and an effect on the value of the properties.

"It's not just the residents of Pointe-a-Bouleau that smell this, some residents of Tracadie-Sheila smell it, hundreds of us do, and when the wind blows it can be smelled all the way to the town hall."

Tracadie-Shelia has set aside $20,000 in hopes to remove the pungent smell of rotting algae in the area.

 

Source: pdf

 

Algae Growth Forces Waterway to Close

Huras, Adam . Daily Gleaner [Fredericton, N.B] 03 Aug 2010: A.5.

MONCTON - Call it the summer of sludge.

A hot and hazy summer mixed with the odd day of intense rain now has some New Brunswick lakes turning slime green with blue-green algae .

"You get warm weather, relatively calm conditions and it comes to the surface quite visibly," said Alyre Chiasson, a biology professor at l'Universite de Moncton.

"There are treatment options out there and at the moment we are working in collaboration with the Department of Environment on what can be done.

"There are options that are out there, but whether they can be done or not will be a decision that takes the Clean Water Act into account."

Moncton's Irishtown Nature Park Lake has once again closed its popular canoe and kayak waterway to boating, swimming and fishing due to an overwhelming algae bloom.

 

Source: pdf

 

Lake Algae Book a Must-read

Roschkov, Tom . Edmonton Journal [Edmonton, Alta] 31 July 2012: A.17.

Re: " Lake algae sparks warning; Alert comes as pilgrims gather at Lac Ste. Anne," the Journal, July 25.

A spiritual pilgrimage to Lac Ste. Anne last week was hampered and somewhat demoralized by an algae bloom. Now warnings have been issued for Pigeon Lake .

Alberta Health Services says Prairie lakes , especially those with a lot of human activity around them, regularly see blue-green algae in July or August. Human activity, indeed! This could be Alberta's understatement of the year.

While algae blooms occur naturally, this province's situation has been multiplied many times over by negligence and mismanagement of water systems. Add this to a long, growing list of Alberta's ecological failures.

It's a complicated matter made all the more confusing by government and industry misinformation.

 

Source: pdf

 

Lake Algae Sparks Warning; Alert comes as pilgrims gather at Lac Ste. Anne

Sinnema, Jodie . Edmonton Journal [Edmonton, Alta] 25 July 2012: A.1.

Two days after people waded into Lac Ste. Anne to offer their prayers during the annual religious pilgrimage, Alberta Health Services issued a warning for people not to drink, wade or swim in the waters because of blue-green algae .

"I'm very concerned," said Clay LeBlanc, executive director of the Lac Ste. Anne Pilgrimage.

LeBlanc said except for high water levels, he hadn't noticed any scum on the south shore of Lac Ste. Anne, where about 10,000 people are camping for the pilgrimage that began Sunday and ends Thursday morning.

Each year, many of the participants wade into the lake about 75 kilometres northwest of Edmonton, praying and seeking the healing powers of the water. The pilgrimage has been a tradition since the late 1800s, when Metis and First Nations began travelling to the lake to celebrate the Feast of Saint Anne, believed to be the grandmother of Jesus Christ.

Rains on Monday night made the area a mud pit. The storm moved water up the shore dramatically, LeBlanc said.

 

Source: pdf

 

Algae Invades Popular Moncton Lake; Environment Scientists consider options after Irishtown Nature Park lake closed to boating, swimming and fishing

Huras, Adam . Telegraph-Journal [Saint John, N.B] 03 Aug 2010: A.4.

MONCTON - Call it the summer of sludge.

A hot and hazy summer mixed with the odd day of intense rain now has some New Brunswick lakes turning slime green with blue-green algae .

"You get warm weather, relatively calm conditions and it comes to the surface quite visibly," said Alyre Chiasson, a biology professor at l'Universite de Moncton.

"There are treatment options out there and at the moment we are working in collaboration with the Department of Environment on what can be done.

"There are options that are out there, but whether they can be done or not will be a decision that takes the Clean Water Act into account."

Moncton's Irishtown Nature Park Lake has once again closed its popular canoe and kayak waterway to boating, swimming and fishing, due to an overwhelming algae bloom.

 

Source: pdf

 

How to Not Let Algae Blooms Harm your Water Fun in the Sun

Karla Gimby Science matters . Daily Gleaner [Fredericton, N.B] 25 June 2008: B.8.

With the heat of the summer descending upon us, more and more people will be seeking comfort and reprieve in some of the cool and welcoming lakes and rivers around the province.

But what, you may ask, does this have to do with blooms?

There is a phenomenon called an algae bloom in which a mass of blue-green algae forms in a body of water. The scientific name of this algae is cyanobacteria, but it is more commonly known as pond scum.

This type of algae grows in shallow, warm, slow-moving or still water such as fresh water lakes , ponds and wetlands. The bacteria can range in colour from olive-green to red.

When conditions are favourable - such as hot, calm weather, most often in July and August - the numbers of algae can increase dramatically, which can lead to blooms.

When the blooms rise to the surface of the water, they cover the surface and can look like thick pea soup. During a blue-green algae bloom, the water looks and smells bad.

Most blooms are short-lived and an affected area will be safe again in a few days or a couple of weeks.

Some algae blooms can be toxic or poisonous if swallowed by wildlife, livestock or people. If you drank water with toxic blue-green algae , you might experience symptoms such as fever, sore throat, dizziness, stomach cramps, diarrhea or vomiting.

If you swim or boat in contaminated water, you may get itchy and irritated eyes and skin.

Not all algae blooms are harmful, though. Between 30-50 per cent of them contain non-toxic cyanobacteria. However, because there is no obvious way to tell if a particular bloom is toxic, samples should be analyzed before a body of water can be declared safe.

 

Source: pdf

 

Algae Reappearing in Former Reservoir

Huras, Adam . Telegraph-Journal [Saint John, N.B] 09 June 2009: A.3.

The guck of the Irish is coming back.

Alyre Chiasson, a Universit de Moncton biology professor, says the slime that turned Moncton's Irishtown Nature Park Lake green last summer is returning.

The lake within New Brunswick's largest urban park was plagued with blue- green algal growth last August, turning its waters from a brownish tinge to vivid green.

As a result, park officials closed the popular canoe and kayak waterway to boating, swimming and fishing, while the cause of the mystery bloom was investigated.

 

Source: pdf

 

Blue-green Algae Invades Reservoir; People, pets urged to stay away from green water in Irishtown Nature Park due to possible health risk

Cochrane, Alan The Times - Transcript [Moncton, N.B] 13 Aug 2008: A.1

There's an ugly green monster lurking in the stagnant water of the Irishtown Nature Park, and experts say it will continue to grow unless something is done about it.

The Irishtown reservoir has taken on a bright green glaze of pond scum -- also known as green-blue algae or cyanobacteria -- primitive microscopic plants that live in fresh water and feed on phosphorus, nitrogen and other nutrients.

The algae is a naturally occuring phenomenon that is apparently an extreme case in Irishtown this year, to the point where the city has urged people to keep themselves and their pets away from the a lake that looks as if the Incredible Hulk took a long bath and left behind a major case of ring around the tub.

The green bacteria floats like a film on the surface, moving slowly with the flow of water through the spillway into a nearby creek. And among the rocks and stagnant corners around the spillway are chunks of bright blue goo the size of a coffee cup or larger. These are called "blooms" but they don't smell like any roses you've encountered before.

Kneel down by the water with a stick and jab it into the blue sludge and you'll see that it is brown on the inside and emits a distinct, stomach- churning aroma.

Alyre Chiasson, a freshwater biologist at l'Universit de Moncton, says the blue-green algae is a naturally occurring phenomenon. Although it is common and natural, it could pose a serious health hazard to humans, animals, fish and anything else that comes in contact with it.

 

Source: pdf

 

Be Aware of Health Risks of Algal Blooms

This section will contain articles by our local talent, and general articles of interest to the lake area.

Public Alert :18 August 2011

FREDERICTON (CNB) – New Brunswickers are advised to be aware of the potential health risks posed by algal blooms in lakes and other bodies of water. The Department of Health issued this reminder today.

Algae blooms can occur in waters when the appropriate conditions are present; this usually occurs during the summer months or early fall. While not all algae blooms are problematic, blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, can produce microcystin toxins.

Microcystins may cause skin, eye and throat irritation and may lead to more serious health effects if consumed.

The water cannot be consumed even after boiling as this does not remove the toxins. Fish caught from water where such blooms are present should have all its organs removed and be thoroughly rinsed with potable water before it is cooked and consumed.

The Department of Health encourages the public to be active and enjoy the outdoors, however, since blooms can be unpredictable people need to be cautious. Before entering a body of water, take note of its quality. Where an algae bloom is suspected (paint-like scum and/or blue/green or other discoloured water) avoid swimming, water-skiing or other recreational activities.

Young children and those with skin conditions may be particularly vulnerable. Blue-green algae can be fatal to pets and livestock.

The departments of health and environment are working together to ensure that reported or suspected blooms are evaluated and that advisories are posted where appropriate. If you suspect that an algae bloom may be present in a lake, please report this information to the nearest Department of Environment regional office.

More information about blue-green algae is available online.

Source : Department of Health: www.gnb.ca/health

 

 

Blue-green Algae Reported in Dozens of Quebec Lakes

Source: globeandmail

 
Boiling doesn't remove problem, so thousands of residents drinking bottled water

TU THANH HA

July 14, 2007

MONTREAL -- In Cowansville, a city southeast of Montreal, about 13,000 residents lined up yesterday for bottled water after being told they couldn't drink from their taps.

At the Saint-Benoît-du-Lac Abbey, the stately monastery overlooking Lake Memphremagog, the monks have to truck in water to make their famous cheeses.

The spread of blue-green algae in Quebec has triggered widespread headaches this summer as the toxic pond scum has been reported in dozens of lakes.

Scientists caution that there has not been a vertiginous increase in the algae.

They say the higher number of reported outbreaks reflect an increased vigilance, not a catastrophic surge.

Nevertheless, those researchers say the algae is a long-existent environmental problem linked to runoff from farming, septic tanks and cottages.

"It's a wakeup call," said Yves Prairie, a specialist in inland water at the University of Quebec in Montreal.

While it's labelled an algae outbreak, the problem is caused by a micro-organism, cyanobacteria, which thrives in slow-moving water, especially water rich in nutrients such as phosphates from dishwashing detergents and fertilizers.

The Quebec Health Department says 55 lakes and rivers are affected, although 49 have only localized outbreaks. In the Eastern Townships cottage country, the algae has hit parts of Lake Memphremagog, a source of water for thousands of people.

Richard Carignan, a biology professor at the University of Montreal, said such a scorecard is misleading.

"You can spot blue algae in every lake. It's their concentration in some lakes that's a real problem."

Prof. Prairie said some places, such as the Quebec end of Lake Champlain - which runs down into New York State and Vermont - are chronically infested.

Others, such as Lake Memphremagog, are not rich in algae nutrients so the outbreak there is likely to be temporary and contained, he said.

Both scientists said many of the 55 lakes on the government list are not facing chronic problems.

"Half the lakes on that list shouldn't be there," Prof. Carignan said.

Still, the scare has had an impact on small towns that rely on summer tourism.

"We've got a lot of worried people here," said Raymond Mallette, a campground owner in Saint-Gabriel-de-Brandon, 100 kilometres northeast of Montreal.

While his campground hasn't been hit, reservations have suffered because one of the two municipal beaches has been affected intermittently by blue algae on Lake Maskinongé.

Bathing and aquatic sports are also banned on a seven-kilometre stretch of the lake's feeder river.

Mr. Mallette, who is also the head of the Chamber of Commerce, said merchants, from the local supermarket to restaurants and the realtors, have all suffered, reporting a drop in revenues of 10 to 80 per cent.

A previous algae outbreak in 2004 resulted in a decline in property values of 15 to 20 per cent, he said.

The algae problem is more acute in Quebec because cottagers here are more likely to have waterfront lawns, which leach fertilizers into the water, Prof. Carignan said.

Quebec's thriving hog farms, which use liquid manure, are also a major cause of runoff, Prof. Prairie said.

Because the water is fouled by a toxin stored in the algae's cells, boiling does not remove the problem.

That is why the people of Cowansville have to drink bottled water for at least two weeks until test results are satisfactory.

The Great Lakes were badly tainted by blue algae until 1972, when Canada and the United States banned the used of phosphates in laundry detergent.

That ban didn't apply to detergents for automatic dishwashers, of which there were few at the time, Prof. Carignan said. Now, cottagers increasingly have dishwashers.

While detergents for those machines contribute only a fraction of the phosphate runoffs (most comes from fertilizers), their impact is felt in resort areas that have been hit by algae even though there is little farming around.

"You can't have shiny dishes and healthy lakes at the same time," Prof. Carignan said. "You can't change farming systems overnight but what you can do overnight is stop using dishwashing detergents with phosphates."

Mr. Mallette said it is impossible to guarantee that an area won't be hit by the algae.

"There are no more assurances that the beaches will be open any more than there are assurances you won't get a hurricane next time you're in Mexico."

 

 

Cottagers Damaging Outaouais Lakes at Alarming Rate, Quebec
Warns

Source: The Ottawa Citizen Pdf here.

November 16, 2004

Dozens of Outaouais lakes are deteriorating rapidly because of cottage development, Outaouais' director for the Quebec Ministry of Environment said yesterday.

Marc Dubreuil said septic tank runoff, the use of detergent and lawn fertilizer are adding nutrients to the lakes more quickly than expected. The process known as eutrophication, causes heavy algae growth, murky water and changes in fish population.

The process is similar to the problem Lake Erie faced during the 1960s when nutrients from sewage and agricultural and urban runoff spurred unchecked growth of algae. When the algae die and decay, they remove oxygen from the water.

Some of the lakes affected include Gauvreau, Blue-Sea, Saint- Pierre, Cayamant, Sicraire, Lemery, Whissel and des Cedres.

Emmanuel Dalpe, a biologist consultant working for the municipality of La Peche, said water quality in Lac Gauvreau west of Wakefield is at risk because of the pressure of human development and cattle raised near a creek that flows into the lake.

Mr. Dalpe said the lake is particularly sensitive because of the sluggish flow of water. He said it takes 18 years for water to flow through the lake into the La Peche River.

The University of Ottawa is doing a study of the lake to determine whether the blue-green algae bloom that occurs in the fall includes toxic strains of algae.

"Some of these blue-green algae could be toxic, and we want to investigate what could happen if it comes into contact with humans," Mr. Dalpe said. "Nobody has reported becoming ill, but that could happen if you ingest it."

Mr. Dubreuil said the ministry doesn't have the resources to monitor all the lakes, but provides technical assistance to municipalities and property owners' associations that want to limit development or ensure septic tanks are correctly installed and pumped out regularly.

The ministry says there is a link between the density of cottage development and lake degradation.

"Human activity puts pressure on the lakes and speeds up their aging because of nutrients that come from septic tanks," Mr. Dubreuil said. "Nutrients flowing into the lakes also come from fertilizer put on lawns, and from erosion due to tree cutting nearby.

"A lot of lakes are at risk of aging rapidly. Waste water with detergent goes into the septic tanks and ultimately into the lakes. It is another source of nutrients in the lakes."

Each lake has a capacity for absorbing nutrients, Mr. Dubreuil said. Below that level, the lake can respond to the inflow of nutrients without becoming murky with algae. But lakes begin to grow algae and aquatic plants when there are more nutrients than they can absorb.

Mr. Dubreuil said people who live around the lakes are the cause of the problem and the ministry believes they should provide solutions.

"We are trying to give people the motivation to reverse the changes that are occurring," Mr. Dubreuil said. "People should minimize the input of nutrients into these lakes.

"The first thing to do is to make sure that provincial regulations for septic tanks are respected. Cottagers have to empty their septic tanks every two years. Municipalities have the power to enforce this and provide a service of emptying tanks at low cost."

Mr. Dubreuil said municipalities can use zoning regulations to increase lot sizes to reduce the density of development around lakes. He said development can be restricted on certain parts of some lakes.

The Ministry of Environment has been giving technical support and courses to municipal inspectors to make sure septic tank regulations are enforced. Mr. Dubreuil said municipalities can enforce protection zones around lakes to ban some types of development if necessary.

Mr. Dubreuil said an increasing number of cottagers complained about the decline in lake water quality in recent years.

"This is something that should concern people," he said. "It used to be that you could go to the lake and have your children swim in front of the cottage. Now some lakes are full of vegetation and your children may not want to go there."

 

 

Let the Gourd Times Roll

Source: Homeandgarden.canoe.ca 

We have a local raccoon. He works alone. Every night he pries the lid off the bird feeder and gorges on six pounds of sunflower seeds while we sleep.

Six pounds of seeds is a lot of roughage, even for a raccoon. He has digestive trouble. We see the evidence deposited wherever nature called.  And called. And called. But the point is, how much can one raccoon eat? We've gone through more sunflower seeds than Costco can keep in stock.

Our "pest-proof" feeder didn't survive the assaults.

Raccoons will happily gorge on anything they can get their hands on

Furry fingers loosened the wire hangers night after night. The feeder would plummet to the ground and spill its bounty (all six pounds).  Even extra wire and my special YWCA camp-craft knots were useless. Because raccoons are smart:  so smart they could hack into the American voting system and change the destiny of the free world. Oh, wait, they've already done that.

We tried leaving a radio blaring at night, set to a head-banger station. In the morning, the seeds were gone but there was evidence of a party (small pointy hats, cigarette butts and volcanic digestive trouble).

We tried Farley Mowat's technique from Never Cry Wolf. I made my male relatives pee around the front yard after dark. Sure enough, we had no wolves that night. But the raccoon wasn't put off. Everywhere we had peed, he retorted with a splat of digestive trouble. It was time to assert my opposable thumbs.

I hopped in the car and drove 45 minutes north of Toronto to Northern Dipper Farm (www.northerndipper.com), Canada's premier supplier of hard-shell gourds. Their charming on-site shop is stuffed with gourd supplies, gourd books, gourd seeds, gourd tools, gourd finishes and gourd art.  Gourd only knows how happy I was.

I chose my weapons: symmetrical canteen gourds, which are grown, harvested and cleaned in Guatemala and then shipped here in huge containers for Canada's growing hoards of gourding enthusiasts.  If you don't believe me, visit the Canadian Gourd Society (www.canadiangourdsociety1.homestead.com).

Gourds are like round wood. You can paint them, dye them, stain them, sculpt them, woodburn them and carve them into bowls, sculptures, tools, containers and drinking vessels. And bird feeders.

I made eight fence-top bird feeders to perch merrily along the chain-link fence, filled to the brim with seeds. All day they're swarmed with finches, bluejays and nuthatches. The raccoons are leaving them alone. (My theory is that he's too fat to perch on top of the fence. Besides, it's painful to sit on pointy chain-link. I learned that the hard way.)

Steps:

It takes about 20 minutes for the local feather brigade to catch on.

 

Memories of Little Yoho Lake

By Gwen Martin 

I first set eyes on Little Yoho Lake on 29 July 1987, two days after moving to my original Yoho Lake home. Over the next 19 years, Little Yoho has become my haven, place of refuge, and reminder of all we have lost and will continue to lose. It also has become a place of profound magic.

Almost every day between July 1987 and today, I have walked the trail to Little Yoho and descended down Chessie’s trail to the shoreline. Over the years I have seen sunsets that made the world stop in its rotation. I have watched a five-legged deer limp her way across the ice in February. With Sophie-dog, I have tracked a she-coyote, seeing where she peed here, sniffed there, laid down for the night beneath spruce branches. And I have heard a 145-year old pine shiver, then fracture in a furious winter storm before collapsing to the icy lake, inches from my head. Its upturned roots are still visible beside the old wooden bench.

In summer, Sophie and I waded along the marshy north end, finding flowers that grow nowhere else in New Brunswick. Pitcher plants live there, feeding off flies. We saw young otters swimming along the shoreline, snuffling at the smell of dog, their curiosity only barely repressed by a more common sense. That same area, in winter, offers the best of ice-skating when snow conditions are kind. You can weave through cattails and the ragged remnants of lilypads, past the old beaver home. And all the while you can see maple leaves frozen and lacy beneath your feet.

Bald eagles, loons, ducks, purple martens, kingfisher, warblers, bear, moose, deer, fox, coyote...all these and more members of our other Yoho community have made their way to Little Yoho Lake just to sit. Often I have stood there, hidden in the shadows of trees, and watched the creatures be quiet and contemplative. It felt as though we were in a church together, communing with the same increasingly besieged god.

After having to leave Yoho for nine months in 2005, I thought continuously of Little Yoho, wondering how the animals were doing, hoping it was being looked after, visualizing the sunsets over the cranberry marsh on the far side. Finally I was able to move home – that is, to a new home situated near the end of the road, closer to my haven. First stop after moving in: Little Yoho. Foolish to say, I wept on the shore, so intensely grateful to be back. It felt as though I could breathe for the first time in months.

It is now early spring. The trail to Little Yoho is being torn up by all-terrain vehicles. What used to be a quiet footway is now a freeway for motorized vehicles heading from nowhere to nowhere. Even the private path that passes by Mr. Chessie's camp to the lake has been traversed repeatedly. The delicately mossy forest floor is shredded and unrecognizable. It is heart-breaking.

But the lake is still there. The sunsets are still evocative. With any luck, the loons will return and the otters also. Perhaps the ATV drivers will tire of the trail and move elsewhere or come to see and regret the damage they are doing. Meanwhile, I and others of like mind will continue to visit Little Yoho each day, watching for signs of spring: the itinerant ducks, the thirsty deer, the earliest shoots of bunchberry and twinflower … and the quavering, ancient throat of loon.

 

Loons Sound Alarm on Mercury Contamination

Sharon Guynup
for National Geographic Today
May 16, 2003

For many North Americans, loons are a much-beloved bird, symbolizing the solitude of the deep-woods wilderness with their distinctive, haunting wail that echoes over the northern lakes where they breed in summertime.

But about 30 years ago, people noticed shrinking numbers of the common loon—a stately black-headed, black-and-white checkered bird—in parts of Northeastern North America. Researchers began capturing loons on their breeding lakes in Southeast Canada in the mid-1990s to study them and monitor reproduction—and discovered high levels of mercury in the birds' blood and feathers.

Additional research showed that birds born in New York State and New England also were being exposed to large quantities of methylmercury, the form of mercury toxic to living things. After winter migration, loons return each year to their birthplace to nest—and these lakes were poisoned.

"The mercury levels in common loons in that part of North America are probably some of the highest levels in living animals anywhere in the world," said Mark Pokras, a veterinarian who runs the wildlife clinic at Tufts University Veterinary School in North Grafton, Massachusetts.

Mercury Alarm

This discovery raised an alarm: pollution in northern lakes posed a significant threat to fish-eating animals—and to people. It also added another dimension to the responsibility of U.S. and Canadian government regulatory agencies.

Now common loons, one of five loon species, are helping scientists better understand the impact of environmental mercury contamination on waterbirds, fish, and other aquatic wildlife. The birds are particularly vulnerable to environmental poisoning for many reasons. They are long-lived—up to 30 years—and they spend their lives in the water, feeding mostly on fish.

"Loons are at the top of the food chain, so they are an excellent indicator of environmental quality," said Nina Schoch, program coordinator for the Adirondack Cooperative Loon Program (ACLP) in Ray Brook, New York. "They are also an extremely charismatic species: people care deeply about them and are concerned about [their welfare]," she said.

These studies have also led to widespread warning for anglers about eating fish from affected regions.

Mercury on the Wind

Most of the mercury pollution that reaches northern lakes is spewed into the atmosphere by large coal-burning power plants and municipal waste incinerators in the Midwest and central Canada.

Wind currents carry mercury hundreds of miles eastward, along with compounds that create acid rain. The pollutants fall to earth in snow, rain, and dust particles, eventually washing into the many lakes and ponds that dot the region.

Few if any fish survive in acid lakes, so loons have less food for their young. Acid rain also increases mercury levels in wildlife: in acidic environments, mercury converts faster to toxic methylmercury.

Mercury's Toll

The dangers of mercury have been well documented in humans, but are less known in wildlife. Lab studies with other birds show that mercury damages the central nervous system, says Neil Burgess, a wildlife toxicologist with the Canadian Wildlife Service. "It tends to disrupt vision and muscle coordination, and is quite toxic to developing embryos," he said. It also seems to weaken immunity, making the birds susceptible to other diseases. d that on acid lakes, adults outnumbered chicks and young birds. "We started looking at reproduction rates in loons in relation to blood mercury levels," said Burgess. "The higher the level, the lower the reproduction."

Field studies revealed that loon pairs suffering from mercury poisoning rarely nested or laid eggs. When they did, they incubated the eggs poorly. Few chicks hatched, chicks didn't feed well, and parents had a hard time feeding them. Scientists wonder whether vision problems from mercury poisoning may be affecting the birds' ability to catch fish.

Now, researchers are determining exactly how high mercury levels need to be before reproduction decreases or stops altogether.

In a recent study by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in the Adirondacks, about one-fifth of the loons they caught and tested had mercury levels high enough to endanger breeding success.

Evaluating Environmental Impact

Researchers affiliated with the ACLP are creating a "wildlife criterion value," tracking how mercury moves up the food chain, from water and sediment into plankton, crayfish, fish and higher predators.

This will show where exposure is highest and how it accumulates. It will also allow scientists to sample water or lake mud and forecast the concentrations in pike and other big fish—or on loons and other species high in the food web, says Schoch.

"It's significant for people, too. We're also eating the fish," she said.

Soon the BioDiversity Research Institute, from Falmouth, Maine, will deliver a report to the USFWS detailing the status of loons, the threats they face—and will present a conservation plan. The Institute is one of ACLP's five partners, which also include the Wildlife Conservation Society, Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and the Audubon Society of New York state.

Controlling Air Pollution

Changes to the Clean Air Act (CAA) in 1990 limited sulfur emissions from power plants, regulations which have improved air quality. But research shows that the standards remain too lax—and mercury continues to be unregulated.

Even with an additional 80 percent reduction in emissions beyond those required by law, it will take waters a quarter-century to become non-acidic, according to a 2001 report by the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation in Hanover, New Hampshire.

In December 2000, the Environmental Protection Agency announced that it will regulate mercury emissions from power plants. The EPA proposal is due in December, with final regulations to be issued in 2004.

In April, New York State's environmental board approved the toughest acid rain law in the nation, far surpassing federal regulations. "Scores of lakes and ponds in Adirondack Park are dead and remain the culprit of air pollution from power plants," said Eliot Spitzer, New York State Attorney General. "This problem can only be tackled by a federal and state effort to enforce the Clean Air Act."

"We know the dangers of methylmercury," says Pokras. "We need to dramatically change our regulatory and industrial practices to eliminate the mercury in our environment."

Otherwise the wail of the loons is at risk in the northern wilderness.

 

New Brunswick

Source: Conservation Council of New Brunswick

Mercury pollution has contaminated our food chain to the point that the New Brunswick Department of Environment and Local Government issued the following advisory: Pregnant women, nursing mothers, women who may become pregnant, and children less than eight years old, should, as a rule, not eat fish from lakes and ponds in New Brunswick.

Mercury is emitted by coal-fired power plants, incinerators and some industrial processes. It persists in the environment and accumulates in organisms, including people. It has caused reproductive problems in wildlife and even at low levels of exposure can cause damage to the developing brain of children before and after birth.

Local sources of mercury have the greatest impact within a 175 km radius, but it is a global problem with mercury transported over long distances with the prevailing winds. In addition to our local sources of mercury, we are on the receiving end of mercury pollution from the garbage incinerators of New England and the coal-fired power plants of the American mid-west.

 

Conflicts with Canada Geese ?

Source: CWS Ontario Region

What You Should Know, What You Can Do

Canada Geese begin looking for nesting sites early in February in south-western Ontario. By mid-March, most pairs have a well-established breeding territory. If nests are destroyed, geese usually attempt to re-nest nearby. The first eggs are laid in late March. Canada Geese lay one egg approximately every 1.5 days. Clutch sizes range from two to eight eggs. By mid-April, most geese are sitting on their nests. Peak hatching occurs during early May.

The V-shaped formations of migrating Canada Geese passing high overhead may be a welcome sign of spring, but geese that breed in temperate regions, such as southern Ontario, can be unwelcome inhabitants of parks, fields and yards.

In recent years, numbers of Canada Geese have increased dramatically in residential and lakeside areas of southern Ontario. This increase can be attributed to desirable habitat, their high reproductive rate and long life span, and a lack of natural predators. Not only are there increasing numbers of geese, but also their range is expanding. Canada Geese can now be found in areas they did not previously inhabit.

Conflicts between people and geese have emerged in rural, urban and suburban settings, as people are faced with geese consuming crops and grass, leaving large amounts of droppings, and at times aggressively protecting their nests. An additional problem in urban areas is the danger around airports where flocks of flying geese are a potential hazard for airplanes.

Environment Canada works with individual landowners, municipalities and farming organizations to overcome goose problems to the extent possible. Several management techniques have been applied, including establishing special hunting seasons that target the “resident” or “temperate-breeding” geese, advising on habitat modifications at problem sites, and sharing research findings with other organizations. Permits are also issued to scare birds or interfere with nesting geese to discourage reproduction through methods such as oiling eggs to prevent hatching.

Canada Geese prefer environments similar to those preferred by humans. The continual development of rural areas will create more open, grassy areas, often immediately adjacent to water bodies. This in turn will increase the amount of the protected habitat preferred by Canada Geese, which will allow the continued growth of urban populations and will undoubtedly increase the number, scope, and severity of human/Canada Goose conflicts in the future.

Source: Arthur E. Smith, Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

What can you do? Why are they here?

Canada Geese will live in an area that meets their needs for food, reproduction and security. An area that provides all of these things provides good habitat. Changing that habitat is the key to discouraging geese from remaining in an undesirable location.

Large grassy areas next to water provide ideal habitat. Geese prefer feeding sites in open areas with access to ponds, lakes or marshes to escape danger. Adjacent areas, such as docks, beaches and yards, provide a safe place for preening and loafing.

Canada Geese are grazers that feed mostly on short grasses such as those found in parks, lawns and golf courses. The geese prefer to feed on short, manicured lawns, so allowing grass to grow longer and choosing coarser grasses will create less hospitable habitat.

Changing the landscape is the most effective long-term and environmentally sound method of discouraging Canada Geese from taking up residence. The geese prefer unobstructed sightlines to feel secure, and will avoid areas where plants or other obstacles block their view of the surrounding area. The use of hedges and shrubs to block visual sightlines will help to discourage Canada Geese. Low fences and gates can be installed while new landscaping takes hold.

Canada Geese – long-time residents of southern Ontario

The Giant Canada Goose is the most common sub-species of Canada Geese in rural and urban southern Ontario. Accounts by 17th century explorers indicate that the geese were part of the area’s original fauna. They were abundant in the extreme south-west, where prairies and wetlands covered hundreds of square kilometers.

However, by the turn of the 20th century, Canada Geese had virtually disappeared from nearly all of their former breeding range within southern Ontario, mainly as a consequence of uncontrolled hunting. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and local conservationists reintroduced Canada Geese to southern Ontario in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Dramatic landscape changes, the loss of predators, and the goose’s own remarkable adaptability have helped its numbers rise. Manicured parks, lawns, golf courses, and agricultural crops flanked by ponds or watercourses provide ideal, secure living conditions. Also, use of fertilizers makes the plants very high quality food for geese.

Adapted from: Resident Canada Geese in Agricultural Southern Ontario Infosheet, 1997

Legal protection for migratory birds

The Canada Goose is a migratory bird in Canada, protected under law by the Migratory Birds Convention Act. The Canadian Wildlife Service, part of Environment Canada, manages and protects migratory birds and their habitat, which includes issuing permits, and setting harvest limits and hunting seasons.

It is against the law to disturb, damage or destroy the nests or eggs of Canada Geese. In some cases, permission may be obtained from the Canadian Wildlife Service.

Property damage caused by Canada Geese can be a nuisance. Landowners or their agents are permitted to scare Canada Geese provided birds are not killed or injured in the process. The use of a scare pistol or shotgun for the purpose of scaring is highly regulated. A permit to discharge a firearm for this purpose must be obtained from CWS.

For more information on permits:

Learn more

 

LOCAL POSTINGS

For Sale

Yoho: 2 Acres Waterfront Lot, Yoho Lake

Posted by Laker on Sunday Aug 26, 2012 @10:10PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

2 Acres , wooded with approx. 1/2 acre cleared and backfilled. Located on YOHO LAKE, on paved Yoho Lake Road. Approx. 300 feet of shore front.

 

Source: Kijiji

 

Yoho: 136 Joho Chessie Drive, Yoho Lake

Posted by Laker on Friday Aug 24 , 2012 @8:10PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Country living at its best only 20 minutes from Fredericton. This beautiful property on Yoho Lake offers lots of privacy as well as 175' of water frontage. This 6 bedroom with 2 full baths makes a wonderful family home. End of private road so very little traffic. Cathedral beamed ceilings, in floor heating with wood boiler, 2 new bedrooms and bathroom on lower level, and new loft with deck on upper level. Catwalk on upper level to deck overlooking the lake. Great swimming, boating, skating, skiing, and snowmobiling. There is no place like Yoho Lake.

 

Source: Kijiji

 

Source: MLS®: 04084747

 

Yoho: 130 Yoho Lake Road, Yoho Lake

Posted by Laker on Monday Aug 20 , 2012 @9:06PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Imagine yourself in this CHARMING YOHO LAKE RETREAT that was completely winterized in 2006 for year-round living, or for your four-season enjoyment as a cottage. 90 FOOT LAKE FRONTAGE. This home offers an open concept living/dining/kitchen area with cozy propane stove & GREAT VIEWS OF THE LAKE, as well as two bedrooms (one currently used as a walk-in closet), and a spacious bathroom (fully equipped with washer and dryer). ALL APPLIANCES INCLUDED – NEW fridge and stove, plus microwave....

 

Source: Kijiji

 

Source: MLS®: 00605973

 

Yoho: Year-round Home on Yoho Lake with Deeded Water Access!

Posted by Cottager on Sunday Jul 08, 2012 @9:00PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

A rare find with deeded access to beautiful Yoho Lake just a short walk away. Enjoy the summer cottage life or live year-round in this 3 bedroom, 1 bath converted mini-home with newer extension including mudroom, bright master bedroom with crown moulding and wide-planked sunroom filled with country charm. This property is turn-key with all appliances included, complete with canoe and single car garage.

 

Source: Kijiji

 

Source: MLS

 

Yoho: 354 Yoho Lake Road, Yoho Lake

Posted by Laker on Sunday Jul 08, 2012 @10:00PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Waterfront at Yoho Lake. This year round home offers lots of space with opportunity to enjoy the benefits of lakeside living. Lots of deck space, warm sunroom to enjoy. Ample oak kitchen cupboards. One of the storage buildings could easily be a bunk house. Located an easy commuting distance from the city.

 

Source: RE/MAX

 

Yoho: Cottage for Sale at Yoho Lake

Posted by Cottager on Thursday Aug 16, 2012 @9:00PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Partially furnished cottage on Jerry Chessie Road @ Yoho Lake with deeded water rights. Newer roof, newer windows, two sets of patio doors and tongue and groove pine throughout. This cottage is a must see especially with the sun room that was added for extra comfort.Drilled Well And Septic System.

 

Source: Kijiji

 

Yoho: 37 Jerry Chessie Road, Yoho Lake

Posted by Laker on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @7:10PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

SOLD - This lovely storey and a half home is move in ready! Just unpack and settle into summers with access to beautiful Yoho lake. This country location is minutes from Fredericton. Large kitchen with island is great for entertaining. The bright living room has a propane fireplace for cozy winter evenings. The main floor offers two good sized bedrooms, bath living and eat-in kitchen- great deck and convenient mudroom. Master bedroom is a large and has an ensuite and huge closet. In the lower level is a family room partially finished, another room used as a bedroom, plenty of storage. Large beautiful property offers deeded water access to Yoho lake just a few steps away.

 

Source: RE/MAX

Source: RE/MAX

 

Yoho: 326 Yoho Lake Road, Yoho Lake

Posted by Laker on Monday Aug 01, 2011 @9:30PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

SOLD -

 

Source: EXiT

 

 

Yoho: 128 Yoho Lake Road, Yoho Lake

Posted by Laker on Thursday May 26 , 2011 @6:12PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

SOLD - SIMPLY SPECTACULAR! That says it all for this 1000 square meter heavenly piece of land on Yoho Lake. With a newer holding tank, deep well and a new set of stairs leading down to a dock this piece of land commands your attention. This land is foundation ready for your new home, and a travel trailer awaits you on this lot so that you can live comfortably while building your dream home this summer. In this instance the pictures are certainly worth a thousand words.

 

Source: ExIT

 

Wanted

Yoho: Wanted - Good Carpenter

Posted by Forrest on Monday 14, 2012 @01:17 PM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Forrest writes "

We would like to have a new deck built on our cottage. Can you recommend a good carpenter?


Telephone: 459-2552

Forrest Orser "

 

 

For Rent

Yoho: For Rent : Waterfront Yoho lake 20min from Fredericton

Posted by Laker on Friday Jul 27 , 2012 @10:00AM
from Somewhere on the Net.

Awesome water front cottage available for rent by the week. on Yoho lake only 25 min from Fredericton city center.

Sliding doors off the living room are 12ft from the water. Private tucked back on our own little cove, which also allows you to wade out onto sand for 30ft enjoying the sunfish at your feet and its only 3 ft deep... then it gets deeper.

This 3 Bedroom 2 level cottage has no drywall, it's all ceder,pine, and hardwood. With 2 bedrms having carpet along side of the Master which boosts Hardwood floors.

Supplied paddle boats & Canoe plus Life jackets for little ones.

 

Source: Kijiji

Source: Youtube1, Youtube2

 

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